Regency P65 Motoryacht

Regency P65 Motor Yacht

Norris Comer New Boats

Regency P65 Motoryacht

When one looks at luxury motoryachts in the 65’ or more range, it’s increasingly difficult to find a bad design. The distinction has evolved into good vs. excellent designs with emphasis on the all-important, no-man’s land of client preferences. The challenge to yachts designers, builders, and brokers of this class is not just to check off all the boxes, but to offer more. It is in the spirit of more that we look at the Regency P65 Motor Yacht, the latest from Taiwanese builder New Ocean Yachts.

First, some context. The original lines of the P65 were penned by ubiquitous naval architect and marine engineer Howard Apollonio with the goal of creating a “mini-megayacht” in 2005. The 2008 recession delayed the launch of the P65 until New Ocean and Premiere Yachts (the local brokerage) collaborated to update the design and tooling to make the vision the reality we see today. For a Regency design, the P65 is on the shorter side; the line currently offers models from 60’ to 96’ length overall. Like all Regency boats, the P65 is semi-custom and gives the owner quite a bit of control over a build’s final form. More on that later.

Let’s start at the stern, where the vast majority of boardings will take place. Not only are there the usual luxury motoryacht attractions—large swim step, dual set of stairs leading forward around an island transom, covered cockpit—but a truly awesome feature is hidden in plain sight: a massive climate-controlled storage area/workshop beneath the cockpit that leads to spacious engine room access. This arrangement will bring tears of joy to handy owners and mechanics alike.

Regency P65 Motoryacht

Also notable is the railing system both above and below deck. You can easily remove the stainless steel sections of rail from their mounting positions to either open up or close in the swim step, or adjust support for boxes of cruising gear or a bicycle below. Also notable aft are twin control stations for extra ease in tight maneuvering.

The clever utility aft is matched by the big-little-yacht luxury of the interior. Right away we noticed the horizontally oriented grain of dark walnut detailing that defines the P65. The interior design has local roots and is the handiwork of Seattle-based designer Sylvia Bolton and now Pacific Custom Interiors.

The result is objectively beautiful, with dual glass doors aft leading forward into the spacious salon. A large flat screen TV deploys with the click of a remote from an integrated housing starboard and is positioned right next to the always necessary mini-bar and wine cooler. A modest set of stairs leads forward to the full-service galley (oriented port) and helm. The design purposefully creates a continuous interior space so, in practice, the skipper can see and hold conversations with guests in the salon, the cook in the galley can easily ask what visitors sitting at the transom seating in the cockpit want to drink, etc. The model we explored featured classy black and white granite countertops that were gorgeous with the walnut.

The helm itself continues the theme of luxury and utility, with two rotating, padded captain’s chairs at the helm and nav station. As one would expect of a yacht like this, a state-of-the-art, three-screen Garmin system is standard. We played with it, and electronic charts, security cameras, and engine data were easily displayed simultaneously. The two chairs even rotate 180 degrees and act as seating at a foldable table that sits between the helm and the galley.

Regency P65 Motoryacht Interior

We kept going forward and inevitably ended up at a spiral staircase that leads down to the accommodations. While the build we explored had three staterooms (master, VIP, and double berth) and two fully enclosed heads, a client could opt for more or less. The stateroom layout we experienced should leave nobody in want, and again we felt like we were on a much larger yacht. The walk-in showers were simply massive with innovative raised textured-tile floors and rain-style shower heads installed overhead. The details really stood out, down to the unique opening mechanisms for the drawers and closets (say goodbye to those annoying pop-style handles), to the faucets that come out of the wall vs. the logistically easier in-wall installation. These little touches add up and left us satisfied in a way that doesn’t come across entirely in a promotional brochure or online click-through tour.

Regency P65 SpecsThe two iconic features of the exterior include the foredeck lounge and, of course, the pilothouse (the “P” in P65). The foredeck lounge, an increasingly popular feature aboard yachts, is as advertised and highly adjustable for ease of stowing and deploying on a sunny day. The covered pilothouse not only features another two-chair helm and nav station (two screens this time) set-up, but also a dinette and table seating. The build we checked out had custom canvas options that enclosed or opened the bridge, a wise move in the Pacific Northwest.

Aft of the covered pilothouse is completely open and typically would be the home of the dinghy (recommended 13’ length overall) and davit system. When the dinghy is deployed, the aforementioned railing segments can be popped into place and transform the bridge into a large socializing space with a view.

This P65 came with twin Caterpillar 12.9L 1,000-horepower diesel engines. Economy speeds of around 8 to 10 knots at 1,000 RPM seem to be the norm, while 2,000 RPM gets the yacht in the 16- to 20-knot cruising speed range. Reported top speed is 23.5 knots.

If you’re into big yacht amenities but don’t want to wander into 70’+ territory, the Regency P65 Motor Yacht is certainly worth a look. If interested in learning more, contact Premiere Yachts, the local dealer. The outfit is run by Martin and Kristen Snyder, who were part of the P65 design collaboration and are immensely knowledgeable. The owner we talked to added his endorsement for the P65.

Regency P65 Motoryacht

“I’m so excited to enjoy this boat,” the owner told us. “It is just perfect for me and my wife, we love just about everything about it. We’re newly retired, fresh out of the rat race, and it’s time to have some fun!”

Photos: Alex Kwanten

Norris Comer

Written by

Norris Comer is the managing editor of Northwest Yachting. He was raised in Portland, Oregon and got his BS in Marine Science at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, FL where he lived aboard a 1973 Catalina 27 before moving to Washington. He has worked as a commercial fisherman, wandered aimlessly around the world, studied oil spills, and was a contestant on the Norwegian reality TV show, Alt for Norge. He loves living in a state where he can explore the ocean and mountains in the same day.

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