Waypoint 36

Waypoint 36

Norris Comer New Boats

Waypoint 36The new Waypoint 36 is designed around the hull and deck tooling of the popular American Tug 365 model that came before it. Built off this proven baseline, the Waypoint 36 should be well-suited to take family and/or friends both safely and comfortably to just about any port of call the skipper desires.

The layout is straightforward, partly due to the high number of molded components of the interior. Because of this, there are fewer custom options to choose from, so what you see is what you get. There are two spacious staterooms with large berths and a tried-and-true dinette in the salon that converts into a berth. The 36 is designed for long-distance cruising with up to six people.

The exterior is similarly straightforward, with a deep-seated and conservatively sized cockpit with swim step access. The cockpit is covered by a deployable canvas top. Primary access to the foredeck is via the cabin, but there are handrails to aid an exposed scuttle both port and starboard.

Another nice feature to note is that the top of the salon aft is wide open and prime real estate for dinghy or paddleboard stowage.

Waypoint 36 SpecsFor a 36’ boat, there’s a ton of space inside. Entering through the aft door from the cockpit, one is greeted by the large salon and galley. Like much of the boat, the 36 has ignored the trendy single level/space approach to cabin design, and instead separates the elevated helm station from the rest of the cabin forward. One feels like they’re in a proper wheelhouse at the helm.

As far as power is concerned, the 36 is pushed along by a single inboard diesel 260-horsepower Volvo. Although we do not have performance specs at this time, the 36 looks like she will have no problem maintaining a classic, fuel-efficient 8 or so knots cruising speed.

If you’ve got a hankering to disappear north for a few weeks (or months), a tug-style trawler like the Waypoint 36 is a good way to go. It’s refreshing to see a local builder stick to their guns, and spying a 36 at quiet anchorages up and down the coast will probably become an increasingly common sight. If interested in pricing or more information, feel free to contact the local builder and dealer, American Tugs.

Norris Comer

Written by

Norris Comer is the managing editor of Northwest Yachting. He was raised in Portland, Oregon and got his BS in Marine Science at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, FL where he lived aboard a 1973 Catalina 27 before moving to Washington. He has worked as a commercial fisherman, wandered aimlessly around the world, studied oil spills, and was a contestant on the Norwegian reality TV show, Alt for Norge. He loves living in a state where he can explore the ocean and mountains in the same day.

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